question

What modulates our Sun? The majority of science work on the principle that the Sun is self modulating and each solar cycle is a product of a random number generator. There are others that suspect the Sun is modulated by the planets with a special emphasis on Uranus & Neptune. Thanks to Carl Smith who has recently left us we have new knowledge that significantly adds to Jose, Landscheidt & Charvàtovà's work.

Geoff Sharp

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Updated: 8 min 30 sec ago

New York Times article “so full of nonsense that it is difficult to read”

Tue, 10/10/2017 - 17:30

Yesterday The New York Times ran an article refuting any ideas that the planet is cooling due to solar activity (or lack thereof). Joseph Kraig provides a wonderful rebuttal.
_________________________

New York Times article “so full of nonsense that it is difficult to read”

By Joseph Kraig

This article is so full of nonsense that it is difficult to read.

There is no universal ice melt. Though the article says ice is melting world wide and the oceans are rising, it is simply not true. The oceans are not rising and in places where it was supposed to rise it has actually gotten lower. Greenland saw a faster and larger increase in ice this year than ever recorded. The Glaciers in Alaska and California are both getting larger.

While the sun appears the same day after day it is not. There have been major increases in ultraviolet emissions during the 80’s and 90’s, those emissions are now falling, dramatically.

As long ago as the Maunder Minimum it was known that fewer sun spots cause cooler weather. We are now in a time that is bringing us to a Maunder type of minimum or Grand Minimum.

While it is true that temperatures have been rising (and falling) since the end of the last glaciation we are at the end or what should be the end of the inter-glacial period. We should appreciate any warming we can get.

The amount of CO2 in the atmosphere is growing. Certainly humans contribute to that growth but the percentage of increase due to human industry is minuscule. In fact the total amount of CO2 in the atmosphere is minuscule. It has never been proven that CO2 is a greenhouse gas. There are much more effective greenhouse gases in our atmosphere such as water vapor and Methane.

There are other sciences discoveries that are changing the way scientist think about Global Warming. Who would have thought a couple decades ago that the stars sending their cosmic rays to us could affect our weather but they do, especially in solar minimums.

Ignorance rules our newspapers and much of society. The truth is out there for all to see but those who don’t like the truth lie and know because of our unwillingness to spend a little time reading that we won’t know any better. I refuse to believe the lies of the Mainstream press apparatus.

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Mexico – Popocatepetl erupts four times in 24 hours

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 21:08

A plume of smoke and steam 1.2 miles (2 km) rose into the sky at 9:04 this morning.

It was the  fourth eruption and the 88th low-intensity exhalation at Popocatepetl Volcano in 24 hours, according to the National Disaster Prevention Centre of Mexico.

Popocatépetl – Wikipedia

The series of explosions and minor eruptions that took place this week have put citizens of the neighboring city of Puebla on alert as ash rained down on the city.

Also, according to rt.com, the seismic activity caused river waters to rise for a period.

After a powerful earthquake struck central Mexico about three weeks ago (September 19), the volcano, located about 43 miles (70 km) southeast of Mexico City, registered two eruptions of steam and gas in the next four days.

http://www.financialexpress.com/world-news/mexicos-popocatepetl-volcano-erupts/887138/

https://www.rt.com/news/406002-multiple-explosions-mexican-volcano-popocatepetl/

Thanks to Ryan and Stephen Bird for these links

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Global cooling – or lack thereof – has nothing to do with solar activity?

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 20:44

Reader interested in feedback

The New York Times refutes any ideas that the planet is cooling due to solar activity (or lack thereof),” says reader.

“In an article today about the Trump administration’s plans to repeal Obama’s greenhouse gas emissions policy, the New York Times included this quick summary about the current scientific assessment of climate change:”

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/climate/what-is-climate-change.html

“Obviously they refute any ideas that the planet is cooling due to solar activity (or lack thereof).

“It’s an interesting read, and I’d be interested in feedback here.”

Terry

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Politicized sustainability threatens planet and people

Sun, 10/08/2017 - 17:52

“The real purpose of ‘dangerous manmade climate change’ is gaining greater agitator and government control over people’s energy use, lives, livelihoods, liberties and living standards.” – Paul Driessen

“It seems nearly everyone wants to advance sustainability principles,” says Driessen. “The problem is, no one really knows what they are. Real sustainability means responsible conservation and stewardship of natural resources. The public relations variety is mostly image-enhancing fluff. Politicized sustainability – the version that’s all the rage on college campuses and among government regulators – insists that we may meet the needs of current generations only to the extent that doing so “will not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs.”

“The problem with this infinitely malleable definition is that it requires us to predict both unpredictable future technologies and their raw material demands. Even worse, we are supposed to protect those future needs even if it means ignoring or compromising the undeniable needs of current generations – including the needs and welfare of the most impoverished, politically powerless people on Earth today. That’s why this irrational, unworkable, environmentally destructive idea deserves to land in history’s trash bin.”

_________________________________

Politicized sustainability threatens planet and people

It drives anti-fossil fuel agendas and threatens wildlife, jobs, and human health and welfare

By Paul Driessen

Sustainability (sustainable development) is one of the hottest trends on college campuses, in the news media, in corporate boardrooms and with regulators. There are three different versions.

Real Sustainability involves thoughtful, caring, responsible, economical stewardship and conservation of land, water, energy, metallic, forest, wildlife and other natural resources. Responsible businesses, families and communities practice this kind of sustainability every day: polluting less, recycling where it makes sense, and using less energy, water and raw materials to manufacture the products we need.

Public Relations Sustainability mostly involves meaningless, superficial, unverifiable, image-enhancing assertions that a company is devoted to renewable fuels, corporate responsibility, environmental justice, reducing its carbon footprint – or sustainability. Its primary goal is garnering favorable press or appeasing radical environmental groups.

Politicized Sustainability is the untenable, even dangerous variety. It relies on ideological assertions and theoretical models as an alternative to actual outside-our-windows reality and evidence. Like “dangerous manmade climate change,” its real purpose is gaining greater agitator and government control over people’s energy use, lives, livelihoods, liberties and living standards. It reflects an abysmal understanding of basic energy, economic, resource extraction, manufacturing and human rights realities.

The most common definition is that “we may meet the needs of current generations” only to the extent that doing so “will not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs.”

Among other alleged human wrongdoing doing, Political Sustainability thus reflects the assertion that we are rapidly depleting finite resources. Therefore, we must reduce our current needs and wants in order to save those resources for future generations. At first blush, it sounds logical, and even ethical.

Ignoring or compromising the undeniable needs of current generations

However, under sustainability precepts, we are supposed to predict future technologies – and ensure that today’s resource demands will not compromise the completely unpredictable energy and raw material requirements that those completely unpredictable future technologies will introduce. We are supposed to safeguard the assumed needs of future generations, even if it means ignoring or compromising the undeniable needs of current generations – including the needs, aspirations, health and welfare of the most impoverished, malnourished, disease-ravaged, energy-deprived, politically powerless people on Earth.

For thousands of years, mankind advanced at a snail’s pace. Then, as the modern fossil-fuel industrial era found its footing, progress picked up rapidly, until the speed of change became almost exponential. How today is anyone supposed to predict what might be in store ten, fifty or a hundred years from now?

Moreover, as we moved from flint to copper, to bronze, iron, steel and beyond, we didn’t do so because mankind had exhausted Earth’s supplies of flint, copper, tin and so forth. We did it because we innovated. We invented something better, more efficient, more practical. Each advance required different materials.

Who today can foresee what future technologies we will have … and what raw materials those future technologies will require? How we are supposed to ensure that future families can meet their needs, if we cannot possibly know what those needs will be?

Ignoring or compromising the pressing needs of current generations

Why then would we even think of empowering activists and governments to regulate today’s activities – based on wholly unpredictable future technologies, lifestyles, needs and resource demands? Why would we ignore or compromise the pressing needs of current generations, to meet those totally unpredictable future needs?

“Resource depletion” claims also fail to account for new technologies that increase energy and mineral reserves, reduce their costs – or decrease the need for certain raw materials: copper, for instance, because lightweight fiber optic cables made from silica (one of Earth’s most abundant minerals) can carry thousands of times more information than a huge bundle of copper wires that weigh 800 times more.

In 1887, when Wisconsin’s Hearthstone House became the world’s first home lit by hydroelectric power, no one could foresee how electricity would come to dominate, enhance and safeguard our lives in the myriad ways it does today. No one could envision the many ways we generate electricity today.

120 years later, no one predicted tiny cellular phones with superb digital cameras and more computing and networking power than a big 1990 desktop computer. No one expected that we would need so much cadmium, lithium, rare earth metals and other raw materials to manufacture thousands of wind turbines.

No one anticipated that new 4-D seismic, deepwater drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies would find and produce so much oil and natural gas that today we still have at least a century’s worth of these vital energy resources – which “experts” had just told us we would run out of in only a few more years.

Ignoring the clear needs of current generations

And yet, we are still supposed to predict the future 50 or 100 years from now, safeguard the assumed needs of future generations, and ignore the clear needs of current generations. We are also supposed to presume that today’s essential natural resources have to last forever. In reality, they only have to last long enough for our creative intellects to discover real, actually workable replacements: new deposits, production techniques, raw material substitutes or technologies.

Of course, all of this is irrelevant to Politicized Sustainability dogma. That doctrine focuses on ridding the world of fossil fuels, regardless of any social, economic, environmental or human costs of doing so. And regardless of whether supposed alternatives really are eco-friendly and sustainable.

For example, mandated U.S. ethanol quotas eat up 40% of this nation’s corn, grown on over 36 million acres of cropland, to replace 10% of America’s gasoline. Corn ethanol also requires billions of gallons of water, and vast quantities of pesticides, fertilizers, tractor fuel and natural gas … to produce energy that drives up food prices, damages small engines, gets one-third fewer miles per gallon than gasoline – and during its entire production and use cycle emits just as much carbon dioxide as gasoline.

Imagine replacing 100% of US gasoline with corn ethanol. How would that in any way be sustainable?

Producing expensive, intermittent, unreliable electricity

Mandated, subsidized wind energy requires millions of acres for turbines and ultra-long transmission lines … and billions of tons of concrete, steel, copper, rare earth metals and fiberglass. The turbines’ subsonic noise and light flicker create chronic health problems for susceptible people living near them, and kill millions of birds and bats annually – to produce expensive, intermittent, unreliable electricity that must be backed up by dozens of fossil fuel generators or billions of (nonexistent) land- and resource-intensive battery arrays.

Meanwhile, American and Canadian companies are cutting down thousands of acres of forests and turning millions of trees into wood pellets that they truck to coastal ports and transport on oil-fueled cargo ships to England. There the pellets are hauled by truck and burned in place of coal, to generate electricity … so that England can meet its renewable fuel targets. How is this sustainable – or “climate friendly”?

Why not just build the fossil fuel power plants … mine for coal and frack for natural gas to fuel them – or build more nuclear power plants – and forget about the ethanol, wind turbines, wood pellets and other pseudo-renewable, pseudo-sustainable false alternatives … until something truly better comes along?

Meanwhile, more than 1.2 billion people still do not have electricity. Another 2 billion have electrical power only sporadically and unpredictably. Hundreds of millions get horribly sick, and five million die every year from lung and intestinal diseases that are due to breathing smoke from open fires … and not having refrigeration, clean water and safe, bacteria-free food.

As Steven Lyazi has noted, these people simply want to take their rightful, God-given places among Earth’s healthy and prosperous people. Instead, they’re being told “that wouldn’t be sustainable.” They’re being told they must be content with a few wind turbines near their villages and little solar panels on their huts – to charge cell phones, pump a little water, power a few light bulbs and operate tiny refrigerators.

Politicized Sustainability is irrational, unjust, inhumane, eco-imperialistic and environmentally destructive. It is especially harmful to the world’s poor. It’s time to rethink and overhaul this insanity.

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org), and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power – Black death and other books on public policy.

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Up to 14 inches of snow for the Rockies

Sun, 10/08/2017 - 14:12

Winter storm warning. Well-below freezing temperatures expected by Monday night.

Oct 8 2017 …WINTER STORM WARNING FROM 9 PM THIS EVENING TO 3 PM MONDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions, including during the morning commute on Monday. Total snow accumulations of 6 to 10 inches, with localized amounts up to 14 inches, are expected.

* WHERE…Rocky Mountain National Park and the Medicine Bow Range, The Mountains of Summit County, the Mosquito Range, and the Indian Peaks, The Northern Front Range Foothills and The Southern Front Range Foothills.

* WHEN…Snow will develop from north to south this evening and become heavy at times overnight. Snow will decrease by Monday afternoon.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Be prepared for significant reductions in visibility at times.

… time to prepare for winter`s return. Check car tires and ensure your emergency kits, flashlights, blankets, ice scrapers etc. are in place and all ready to go. Drain outdoor sprinkler systems to protect them from the well below freezing temperatures expected by Monday night.

http://www.weather.gov/bou/

Thanks to Kenneth Lund for this link

 

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I am in such a predicament, says reader

Sat, 10/07/2017 - 17:02

“Expect more blizzards moving forward,” says reader Lee Holsen, quoting a recent article on this site. “This is just a taste.”

“I am in such a predicament,” Holsen continues.

“As a snowskier, I want more snow. As a current resident of Houston where it’s still hitting 90 in October, I want below average temps all the time. And as a “climate denier”, I want to have a real cooling period start and show all the alarmists that man isn’t squat compared to the sun.

“BUT I know if a real cooling period starts; it’s going to wreck growing seasons for food so bad that worldwide starvations and wars over food could start.

“Luckily, I do believe the sun is in charge and it really doesn’t matter what I want; it’s going to be the decider and my wants are not going to be at fault.”

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Betting on HIGH, or LOW?

Sat, 10/07/2017 - 16:51

Many, many years ago I owned a summer home just 10 miles from Show Low, which made this article more fun for me.
– Robert
________________________

Betting on HIGH, or LOW?

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser

Just in case you are wondering what this about, it’s about the small town of Show Low in Arizona with a population of around 10,000. If you want to read up on more details, see http://www.showlowaz.gov/517/City-Profile .

Some years ago, we were visiting the place and had a pleasant experience. What intrigued me though was the name of the town. Our waitress explained that it stemmed from a long-ago poker game, where the LOW card(s) were going to win, NOT the HIGH card(s).

As in any game of luck that has a 50/50 chance of being right or wrong, the former owner of that tract of land (some 65 square miles of it, I believe) lost out and the new owner renamed it in memory of his call and win.

Place Names

As we speak of place names, there certainly are some quite unusual ones, at least in the Americas.  Just think of place names like “King of Prussia (Pennsylvania),” “Medicine Hat (Alberta),” “Scratch Ankle (Alabama),”  ”Cut and Shoot (Texas),” “Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!  (Quebec),” or “Get out if you can! ([Salsipuedes], Chile)” for settlements.  Unusual names for lakes, rivers, and other natural sites like “Whiskey Lake (Ontario)” or ”Extortion Lake (Minnesota),” and “Christmas Island (Indian Ocean)” are quite common as well. That’s just a small sampling of unusual place names.

Good “ol” Wiki has several lists of such names at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Unusual_place_names and Reader’s Digest has its own list “24 of the Funniest Town Names in America,” though none of them appear to mention “Show Low.” Perhaps it’s the name itself that causes its lack of recognition; who would want to bet on a “LOW” show when everyone is always expecting MORE (not LESS), or BETTER, or HIGHER of whatever?

And who does not want to gamble a bit, at least a little, on the side? After all, as the nearby graph will show, it’s a thriving business.

Past and projected future gambling activities; source: Agora Financial, September 25, 2017.

Gambling

Gambling has been a past time activity that’s known in many cultures since ancient times. Even the tribal communities on this continent are well known to have engaged in it. From the Inuit communities in the far north to those in the far south, all had some games of chance. The only difference being the “assets on the table.” The graph above is part of a recent article entitle “Absolutely Insane Growth” by Louis Basenese, Chief Investment Strategist, True Alpha. No doubt about that, gambling is a big industry and growing. If you don’t believe that, just travel across the country, in the middle of the night, and you will find gambling casinos that are open 24/7, even in places you didn’t know to exist.

I like to visit them – not for the gambling (except, perhaps for a dollar or two) – but for the food. In order to keep the players coming, they commonly provide some good food at reasonable prices. Of course, non-gambling customers like me are not particularly welcome but oddballs or no-good moochers and are just part of the cost of doing business and to run the system.

There you have it; we are just little cogs in the wheel of fortune that seems to drive the world to greater heights.

Heights of Excitement

Whenever one of the many lotteries is having a run of no-wins of the grand prize the excitement grows exponentially with the stake. Who would want to wager for a mere “$X”-million if one could win “$XX”-million instead? At such times, every corner-store is trying to sell even more tickets for the next draw than ever before.

Of course your chance of winning does not increase with the total number of tickets sold, only with the fraction of the total that you actually hold. So, people are willing to spend more, often much more, accordingly. Of course, nearly every habitual player does that and, in the end, the odds of you winning are still the same, sort of infinitesimally small.

Besides, really, what would I do with triple-digit millions? I have no idea other than trying to do some good for others.

But with miniscule chances of ever winning the jackpot, I use my own system of winning, every week:

Betting on “LOW” and not playing at all.

_________________________________________________

Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser is a professional scientist with a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Technical University, Munich, Germany. He has worked as a research scientist and project chief at Environment Canada‘s Canada Centre for Inland Waters for over 30 years and is currently Director of Research at TerraBase Inc. He is author of nearly 300 publications in scientific journals, government and agency reports, books, computer programs, trade magazines, and newspaper articles.

Dr. Kaiser has been president of the International Association for Great Lakes Research, a peer reviewer of numerous scientific papers for several journals, Editor-in-Chief of the Water Quality Research Journal of Canada for nearly a decade, and an adjunct professor. He has contributed to a variety of scientific projects and reports and has made many presentations at national and international conferences.

Dr. Kaiser is author of CONVENIENT MYTHS, the green revolution – perceptions, politics, and facts
convenientmyths.com

Dr. Kaiser can be reached at: mail@convenientmyths.com

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French wine output lowest since 1957 – Italy wine output even lower

Sat, 10/07/2017 - 11:12

“The drop in production will be mainly on account of the hard spring frost,” the French Agriculture Ministry said. 

Wine volume in France will fall 19% to this year, to about 4.9 billion bottles (36.9 million hectolitres ), the ministry forecasts.

That’s the lowest production in 60 years, since 1957, when a spring freeze also destroyed flower buds.

The situation is far worse in some parts of France. In the Bordeaux region, which was hardest hit by frost in late April, production is falling 39% to 3.55 million hectolitres.

For Italy, the numbers are confusing.

According to bangkokpost.com, Italy’s vineyards suffered less damage from frost and drought, and yet, the same article says that the country’s wine volume is forecast to fall 24% to 47.2 million hectolitres.

That looks to me like more damage, not less.

Either way, it would be hard to say that global warming is the culprit.

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1337991/french-wine-output-lowest-in-60-years?utm_source=bangkopost.com&utm_medium=homepage&utm_campaign=most_recent_box

Thanks to Stephen Bird for this link

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Video – Record-breaking snowstorm caused by sunspot cycle?

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 20:48

“Expect more blizzards moving forward. This is just a taste.”

Why would a record-breaking snowstorm hit Montana this early in October? The creator of this video blames the sunspot cycle.

 

“We had a huge amount of blizzards in the 1890s during the Dalton Minimum.”

“We had a huge amount of blizzards in the Glassberg Minimum.”

“And now, we’re having a ton more blizzards moving into the Modern Minimum.”

According to the National Weather Service in Great Falls, Montana, this storm was effectively a blizzard in the Havre area, especially considering the severe impacts.

Elsewhere, Zortman, Montana set a new one day record for October with 14 inches of snow reported Tuesday morning.

The heaviest estimated snow amount from this storm was 30 inches in Rocky Boy, Montana. Drifts in at least one location were estimated to be eight feet high, and many areas in Montana, Colorado and Wyoming received a foot (30 cm) or more of snow.

A blizzard occurs when the following conditions are met for at least three consecutive hours: sustained winds or frequent gusts to at least 35 mph and considerable falling and/or blowing snow that frequently reduces visibility to less than a quarter mile.

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Montana Indian Reservation Digging Out After Heavy Snowstorm – Video

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 12:39

5 Oct 2017 – The Chippewa Cree Tribe on Rocky Boys Indian Reservation is slowly digging out after being buried by heavy, wet snow.

The Montana Department of Transportation is clearing the roads, crews are digging out people with medical needs, and the local electric company has restored power to all except about ten homes.

Chippewa Cree Tribal Water Resource Director Dustin White is asking residents to be patient as crews slowly work through the heavy and wet snow.

(According to Wikipedia, the Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation, located in northeastern Montana about 40 miles (64 km) from the Canadian border, is reported to have 6,177 enrolled members.)

http://www.krtv.com/story/36523896/rocky-boy-slowly-emerging-after-snowstorm

Thanks to Argiris Diamantis for this link

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Earthquake Swarm at Yellowstone Supervolcano Second Longest Ever Recorded

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 12:46

Over the past 3½ months, almost 2,500 earthquakes have been recorded in Yellowstone National Park.

The ongoing earthquake swarm, which started on June 12, now rivals a swarm in 1987, the longest swarm ever recorded at the massive supervolcano. During that swarm, more than 3,000 earthquakes struck the area in three months.

But don’t worry. “The swarm in no way signals an impending eruption,” reports newsweek.com

See more:
http://www.newsweek.com/yellowstone-supervolcano-earthquake-swarm-longest-ever-recorded-677387

Thanks to Vance von Raab and Gordon Broussard for this link

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Poll shows Trump approval rating at 45 percent

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 12:01

This despite massive media attacks.

__________________

Thursday, October 05, 2017

Today’s Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll shows that 45% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-four percent (54%) disapprove.

When you consider that you can’t turn around without seeing or hearing some new media attack on the man, this is an amazing accomplishment.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/trump_administration/prez_track_oct05

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Russia – Record cold in South Ural region

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 11:45

On October 3, the mercury plunged to -7.3C in the city of Magnitogorsk, easily breaking the previous record of -5,0C set in 1955.

In other parts of the Urals, the temperature is running 6-8 degrees below the norm.

Magnitogorsk, a city of 440,000, lies about one thousand miles east and slightly south of Moscow.

http://www.meteo-tv.ru/news/Kommentarii-sinoptika/Na-Urale-rekordy-kholoda-na-Dalnem-Vostoke-dozhdi-i-veter/

Thanks to Alexey Parkhomenko for this link

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Snowfall disaster in Russia – Crops buried under more than a foot of snow

Wed, 10/04/2017 - 10:44

Emergency declared in three regions of Khakassia. Harvesting of feed and grain crops temporarily suspended. 

Russia 4 Oct 2017 –  “The bread went under the snow.” For agrarians, snow on top of unharvested fields is a real disaster.

At first came the heavy rains so harvesting couldn’t begin. Then came the frosts and snow, from 10 to 40 cm (4 to 16 inches) deep. Under the snow is the harvest of 2017 … A real disaster.

“The bread went under the snow.”

“Barley is completely laid down, the snow is wet, heavy, I do not know whether the ear will rise after melting snow or not. Here 120 hectares, there is a wedge of 150 hectares, and more oats. Only 480 hectares went under the snow,” complains Vasily Aprelkov, a farmer from the Bograd region.

“We have in some territories 5-10 cm, in others up to 40 cm fell. But the total area of grain and fodder crops remaining under snow is enormous, “says Valery Sulekov, deputy head of the Ordzhonikidzevsky district.

According to preliminary data, 3,000 hectares were affected in the Bogradsky region, 18,000 in Shirinsky and 22,000 in Ordzhonikidzevsky. Only 43,000 hectares of grain and forage crops. At first glance, the damage amounts to 120 to 150 million rubles.

“For agrarians falling snow on unharvested fields is a real disaster,” said Alexander Bashkov, the head of the Ministry of Agriculture.

http://www.krsk.aif.ru/society/hleb_ushel_pod_sneg_v_hakasii_iz-za_pogody_obyavlen_rezhim_chs

Thanks to Argiris Diamantis for this link

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Record-breaking snowstorm – “effectively a blizzard” – hits Rockies

Tue, 10/03/2017 - 16:59

Sets record not just for the date, but for the entire month of October – and it’s only October 3.

The heaviest October snow in Montana in more than 100 years has caused widespread power outages and downed trees in parts of Montana and Colorado. All of Havre, Montana, a city of 9,800, lost power.

With 37.6 cm (14.8 inches) of snow as of late Monday night, Havre experienced what was effectively a blizzard, NWS Great Falls said.

 

Havre, Monana, 3 Oct 2017 Photo courtesy Ann Kulczyk #mtwx via National Weather Service

“The current October record high snow is 21.8 cm (8.6 inches) set on October 4, 1914,” the NWS said. (Again, note that that record is for the entire month of October, not just the day).

The NWS Great Falls said the storm total snowfall for Havre from Monday through this morning is 39.4 cm (15.5 inches).

The heaviest estimated snow amount from this storm is 76.2 cm (30 inches) in Rocky Boy, Montana.

According to the Weather Channel, some areas had as much as 2 feet (60 cm) of snow on the ground.

Eight-foot (2.4m) snowdrifts were estimated in at least one location.

https://watchers.news/2017/10/03/havre-montana-record-breaking-snowstorm/

http://billingsgazette.com/inches-of-snow-in-havre-as-storm-blankets-hi-line/article_b5495309-898d-5cc0-b979-17f70f371919.html

See video:
https://weather.com/storms/winter/news/rockies-snow-montana-colorado-wyoming-early-october-2017

Thanks to Guy Wilson, Clay Olson and Tom0Mason for these links

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Colorado snowstorm knocks out power to 45,000 homes

Tue, 10/03/2017 - 12:18

“Welcome to winter, right?” 
_______________________

2 Oct 17 – Beginning around 8 p.m. on Sunday night, the power outages affected nearly 45,000 homes in the mountain region, according to vaildaily.com. As of 11 a.m. more than 10,000 homes still remained without power.

The heavy, wet snow created havoc on mountain roads.

Closures on Interstate 70 at the Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnel and Vail Pass left drivers marooned in Georgetown and at a shelter in Vail, which soon filled to capacity.

“It’s been a long morning,” said Colorado State Patrol Sergeant Patrick Williams. “Welcome to winter, right?”

Steamboat Springs reported 19 inches (48 cm) of snow, while Arapahoe Basin and Loveland, who are in a race to be the first resorts to open for the season, both received 17 inches (43 cm). Both Vail and Copper Mountain reported 12 inches (30 cm) of snow.

Red Cliff, south of Vail, reported 14 inches (36 cm), while Winter Park reported nearly 10 inches (25 cm).

I guess children in Colorado are going to know what snow looks like after all.

See photos:
http://snowboarding.transworld.net/news/dump-alert-colorado-gets-hit-snow/

http://www.vaildaily.com/news/snowstorm-creates-havoc-on-mountain-roads-power-outages-in-45000-high-country-homes/

http://www.coloradoan.com/story/weather/2017/10/02/fall-storm-brings-up-18-inches-snow-colorado-peaks/723996001/

Thanks to Stephen Bird and Vance von Raab for these links

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Funding the arts – or hurricane recovery

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 20:14

“Would it really be so terrible if Congress trimmed funding for the National Endowment for the Arts?” asks Paul Driessen. “NEA money keeps the arts alive, say some, but would only buy a thousand Tesla S P90D electric cars. On the other hand, if just 1,500 ultra-rich culture devotees ponied up just $100,000 apiece, they’d fully fund the entire NEA program.

“More to the point, rebuilding Puerto Rico alone will top $30 billion; repairing damage from Harvey and Irma will exceed $150 billion; and the hurricane season isn’t over yet. Might it be time to set some spending priorities? Or is the NEA just one more of those federal programs that President Reagan called the closest thing on Earth to eternal life?”

 

Funding the arts – or hurricane recovery

With only so much taxpayer cash, what should our priorities be in this year of big hurricanes?

By Paul Driessen    

A couple of friends recently said it was terrible that some in Congress and the White House could even consider reducing National Endowment for the Arts funding. It’s a critical program, they feel, essential for the very survival of many community and even big-time theaters, orchestras and other arts programs. The thought of trimming the NEA shows a low regard for this important component of civilized society.

For centuries, Kings and princes funded composers, artists, symphonies, operas and artwork, especially back in the days when royalty controlled the lands and wealth – and paid their peasants a pittance (if at all). Letting them listen to or gaze on some of the artistic creations helped keep them happy in an era when illiterate serfs were happy dreaming of being rewarded in the afterlife.

The National Endowment for the Arts was launched in 1965 and has enjoyed steady funding by taxpayers. Its $150 million 2017 budget covers offices, staff salaries, and numerous grants and contracts.

The Los Angeles Times opined in March of this year that the NEA’s budget is “minuscule compared to other federal expenditures.” $150 million “won’t even get you a Picasso at auction.” It would only buy a thousand Tesla Model S P90D electric cars. The Defense Department receives 3,600 times more money; maybe the Pentagon should economize on toilet paper, the column suggested.

All of this raises compelling issues that could generate interesting congressional or talk radio discussions.

America is the land of millionaires and billionaires – folks who can and do afford Picassos, (taxpayer-subsidized) Teslas, and box seats at symphonies and operas that average taxpayers rarely attend. If just 300 Hollywood, Silicon Valley, social media and other ultra-rich culture devotees ponied up just $500,000 apiece, they’d fully fund the entire NEA program. So would 1,500 of them giving just $100,000 each, instead of buying yet another mansion, yacht, private jet or vacation island.

While the Defense Department is a favorite target for liberal pundits, defending the homeland is one of the most critical roles of government – and one that citizens, communities and even states cannot do on their own. Like it or not, we remain embroiled in conflicts overseas, and bad actors Iran and North Korea are on the verge of getting nuclear weapons and delivery systems.

Security expert Cliff May reports that Nicolas Maduro’s Venezuelan dictatorship (likely with Cuban help) is providing passports to a host of Jihadi warriors, so that they can utilize the socialist-Islamist-narco-terrorist-gun-running alliance more effectively to ply their lethal trade here in the United States. National Counterterrorism Center director Nicholas Rasmussen warns that these and other terrorists may soon employ drones to drop grenades or spread poison gases on crowds of Americans.

Gunning people down in California, Florida, Tennessee and Texas, bombing the Boston Marathon, slamming jets full of fuel and passengers into NYC and DC buildings, mowing pedestrians down with vehicles, and murdering police officers reflect pure evil. It will be worse when more ISIS butchers arrive on our shores. We should cut DoD waste, but never protections for our families, lives and freedoms.

The LA Times article was written five months before Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria visited death and rampant destruction on Texas, Florida, Georgia, Puerto Rico and other communities.

The question now is, how does NEA funding stack up against the urgent need to restore electricity to Puerto Rico and rebuild homes, businesses, infrastructures and lives in hundreds of badly impacted neighborhoods? Indeed, how does funding a vast host of federal programs stack up against that need?

President Obama was lucky. He presided over two-thirds of the longest Category 3-5 hurricane drought in U.S. history: eight years out of a record twelve (even as atmospheric carbon dioxide levels kept rising). How he would have handled even one, to say nothing of three back-to-back monster storms, we will never know. Nor will we know how he’d have handled these budget questions, though we can guess.

Just recall how many “shovel-ready jobs” were actually created by $1 trillion in stimulus funding.

Of course, this wasn’t the first time the USA was hammered by several monster hurricanes in a very short span. 1879, 1893, 1909, 1933, 1954 and 2005 come to mind. And those are just the big ones that pounded the U.S. mainland. This year’s hurricane season isn’t over yet, so disaster preparedness remains vital.

Thankfully, this year FEMA was on the job in record time. However, rebuilding Puerto Rico alone will top $30 billion, following the worst storm to hit the island since 1928. Repairing damage from Harvey and Irma will exceed $150 billion, Moody’s Analytics estimates.

Families will have to dip into savings and do a lot of the work themselves. However, the financial burden will also be shouldered by private insurance companies, or by the federal government’s flood insurance program, and by FEMA and other disaster assistance loans and grants. Still more will be covered by hundreds of public and private companies, churches, synagogues and nonprofit charities, and direct citizen donations. JJ Watt raised $30 million via YouCaring.com, and Gleaning for the World has been typically efficient in shipping life-giving supplies to Texas, Florida and the Caribbean. Please give!

Congress has appropriated $15 billion in hurricane disaster relief, with more to come for those areas and the islands. Legislators assume and hope that funds will somehow materialize to cover this – and all the other programs that President Reagan liked to quip were the closest thing on Earth to eternal life.

Complying with myriad federal regulations costs us nearly $2 trillion a year – more than all personal and corporate taxes paid to Uncle Sam. If more of those rules are trimmed, and a long-overdue tax overhaul ultimately brings in many billions in additional tax revenues as the economy is reinvigorated, budgetary needs could be met and the private sector could weigh in with yet more help. Here’s another idea.

Federal and state laws could require that anyone from hurricane-impacted areas who expects another welfare or unemployment check must help clean up, repair and rebuild their communities. Many or most people on these “entitlement” rolls are strong and able-bodied. By serving their communities and country, they would learn new skills, find new friends, mentors and role models, and embark on paths to lifetime achievement. Indeed, the return to “workfare” and responsible citizenship should be nationwide.

As George Mason University professor Walter Williams observes, “The No. 1 problem among blacks is effects stemming from a very weak family structure.” This is “a legacy of the welfare state ushered in by the War on Poverty” and continued by “politicians, civil rights leaders and academics who assert that every problem confronting blacks is a result of a legacy of slavery and discrimination.”

“Children from fatherless homes are likelier to drop out of high school, die by suicide, have behavioral disorders, join gangs, commit crimes and end up in prison,” he states. “They are also likelier to live in poverty-stricken households.” Indeed, that holds true for white, Hispanic and other ethnic groups.

Williams also points out that federal spending in 2017 will top $4 trillion. At $1 trillion, Social Security will take up most of it. Defense ($598 billion), Medicare ($582 billion) and Medicaid ($404 billion) are the next-largest expenditures. Other federal social spending – on food stamps, unemployment compensation, child nutrition, child tax credits, supplemental security income and student loans – total roughly $550 billion. In fact, social spending by Congress consumes about two-thirds of the federal budget, he notes.

Congress doesn’t get this money from the tooth fairy or Santa Claus, Williams concludes. It uses “threats, intimidation and coercion to confiscate” money from one American, to give it to another American.

As the nation marshals its resources to rebuild shattered communities in this latest year of big hurricanes – and Congress and the White House begin deliberating major changes in the Tax Code – it’s a perfect time to begin debating all these issues, reexamining our priorities, and putting America back to work: for a regular paycheck … or in return for continued welfare or unemployment checks.

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org), and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power – Black death and other books on public.

 

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Is this how Stonehenge was built?

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 18:10

Nothing to do with climate, but I found it fascinating.

This man has figured out how to move 20-ton blocks by hand.

Thanks to Winona Campbell for this video

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Heavy snow for Alberta and Saskatchewan

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 12:48

Up to 12 inches of snow in southwestern Saskatchewan – Hazardous winter conditions expected – Highway closures likely

Monday 02 October 2017 (Excerpts)

The first winter storm of the season to affect southern Alberta will also hammer the southwestern corner of Saskatchewan today.

Heavy wet snow that began overnight will continue to fall throughout the day, with accumulations approaching 30 cm (11.8″) expected along the Trans-Canada highway from west of Swift Current to the Alberta border including the Cypress Hills area. The snow will be accompanied by northerly winds gusting to 80 km/h (49.7 mph), which will result in white-out conditions at times. Highway closures in this area are likely, and motorists are advised to postpone travel until the storm has passed.

Snow will continue tonight, with a further 15 cm (5.9″) expected. The snow will gradually taper off on Tuesday.

Rapidly accumulating snow could make travel difficult over some locations. Prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions. Visibility will be suddenly reduced to near zero at times in heavy snow and blowing snow.

http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/report_e.html?sk5#1014213851444725527201710020501ww1373cwwg (also sk4 in the adress link for the Shaunavon – Maple Creek – Val Marie – Cypress Hills warning)

http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Thanks to Terry Homeniuk for these links

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Heavy snow for Montana and Wyoming

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 20:05

Snowfall accumulations – 6 to 24 inches – Tree and power line damage expected – Roads impassable in some areas
(Excerpts)
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Glasgow MT
725 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…FIRST SNOWFALL OF THE SEASON…

.A potent storm system from the Canadian Rockies will sweep across the region through Tuesday.

Southwest Phillips-Including the city of Zortman

WINTER STORM WARNING FROM NOON MONDAY TO NOON TUESDAY…

* ACCUMULATIONS…Snow accumulation of 6 to 10 inches.

* IMPACTS…The heavier snow expected in the higher elevations of the Little Rocky Mountains will combine with the strong winds
to create reduced visibility at times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A Winter Storm Warning for snow means severe winter weather conditions are expected or occurring. Significant amounts of snow
are forecast that will make travel dangerous. Only travel in an emergency. If you must travel keep an extra flashlight, food, and
water in your vehicle in case of an emergency.
……………………………….
West Glacier Region-
638 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING FROM 6 AM MONDAY TO 6 AM MDT TUESDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow and blowing snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions. Below 4000 feet total snow accumulations of 1
to 3 inches are expected. Above 4000 feet 3 to 5 inches, and localized amounts up to 15 inches across the highest terrain.
Travelers over Marias Pass should plan for low visibility due to snow and blowing snow with 8 to 12 inches total accumulation by
Tuesday morning.

* WHERE…Bad Rock Canyon, Essex, Highway 83 Bigfork to Swan Lake, Marias Pass, and Polebridge.

………………………….

Elkhead and Park Mountains-Flat Tops-Eastern Uinta Mountains-
621 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING UNTIL MIDNIGHT MONDAY NIGHT…

* LOCATIONS INCLUDE…Columbine, Hahns Peak, Toponas, Buford,
Trappers Lake, Manila, and Dutch John.

* SNOW ACCUMULATION…12 to 20 inches.

* VISIBILITY…Less than 1/2 mile at times.

* IMPACTS…The heavy snow will make many roads impassable and may produce widespread power outages due to the weight of the
snow on tree limbs and power lines.
…………..

Gore and Elk Mountains/Central Mountain Valleys-
621 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING UNTIL MIDNIGHT MONDAY NIGHT ABOVE 9000 FEET…

* LOCATIONS INCLUDE…Vail Pass, Independence Pass.

* TIMING…Snow…heavy at times…will continue through Monday evening.

* SNOW ACCUMULATION…6 to 10 inches.

* SNOW LEVEL…10,000 feet then lowering to near 8000 feet by Monday morning.

* VISIBILITY…Less than 1/2 mile at times.

* IMPACTS…The heavy snow will make many roads impassable and may produce widespread power outages due to the weight of the
snow on tree limbs and power lines. Strong winds will lead to blowing snow, reduced visibility, and additional power outages.

……………………………..
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Denver/Boulder CO
359 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…Wintry weather coming to the northern Colorado mountains tonight and Monday…

.A weather system being driven by a powerful Pacific jet stream will remain over Colorado tonight and Monday, bringing widespread precipitation to the north central Colorado mountains. Snow levels are expected to drop to 7,500 feet or lower near the Wyoming border, and 8,500 to 9,000 feet along the I-70 Corridor by tonight. Snowfall will be moderate to heavy at times, especially over Grand, Jackson and western Larimer Counties. The storm system is expected to be moving out of the state by Monday afternoon with snowfall rates decreasing at that time.

West Jackson and West Grand Counties Above 9000 Feet-South and East Jackson/Larimer/North and Northeast Grand/Northwest Boulder Counties Above 9000 Feet-Including the cities of East Slopes Park and Northern Gore Ranges, Gore Pass, Rabbit Ears Pass, Cameron Pass, Laramie and Medicine Bow Mountains, Rabbit Ears Range, Rocky Mountain National Park, and Willow Creek Pass
………………………..
359 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING UNTIL MIDNIGHT MDT MONDAY NIGHT…

* TIMING…Snow along with embedded thunderstorms will continue this evening and become heavier through tonight. Precipitation
should decrease by Monday evening.

* SNOW ACCUMULATIONS…8 to 16 inches with locally higher
amounts possible.

* WIND/VISIBILITY…As low as one quarter mile during periods of heavy snow.
………………………………….
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Great Falls MT
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

Cascade-Judith Basin-Fergus-Meagher-Including the following locations Great Falls, Cascade, Belt, Kings Hill Pass, Raynesford, Stanford, Hobson, Lewistown, Winifred, Lewistown Divide, Grass Range, Martinsdale, and White Sulphur Springs
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING FROM 9 AM MONDAY TO NOON MDT TUESDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions.
Total snow accumulations of 6 to 12 inches on the plains, with 12 to 24 inches in the mountains, are expected.

* WHERE…Cascade, Judith Basin, Fergus and Meagher Counties.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Be prepared for significant reductions in visibility at times. Tree and power line damage expected.

……………………………………….
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Great Falls MT
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

Northern Rocky Mountain Front-Eastern Glacier-Toole-Eastern Pondera-Southern Rocky Mountain Front-Including the following locations Logan Pass, Marias Pass, Browning, Heart Butte, Cut Bank, Shelby, Sunburst, Brady, Conrad, Bynum, Choteau, and Augusta
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 3 AM MONDAY TO 6 AM MDT TUESDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow and blowing snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions, including during the evening commute on Monday. Total snow accumulations of 8 to 12 inches on the plains, with 10 to 20 inches in the mountains, are expected.

* WHERE…Northern Rocky Mountain Front, Eastern Glacier, Toole, Eastern Pondera and Southern Rocky Mountain Front.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Winds gusting as high as 40 mph will cause areas of blowing and drifting snow. Significant reductions in visibility along with tree and power line damage are expected.

http://www.weather.gov/greatfalls
…………………………………………..
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Great Falls MT
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

Hill-Chouteau-Liberty-Blaine-Eastern Teton-Including the following locations Havre, Rocky Boy, Rudyard, Fort Benton, Carter, Big Sandy, Chester, Whitlash, Chinook, Harlem, Hays, Fairfield, and Dutton
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM MONDAY TO NOON MDT
TUESDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions.
Total snow accumulations of 4 to 12 inches on the plains, with 12 to 24 inches in the mountains, are expected.

* WHERE…Hill, Chouteau, Liberty, Blaine and Eastern Teton Counties.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Be prepared for significant reductions in visibility at times. Tree and power line damage expected.
……………………………….
National Weather Service Great Falls MT
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

Central and Southern Lewis and Clark-Jefferson-Broadwater-Including the following locations MacDonald Pass, Rogers Pass, Boulder Hill, Elk Park Pass, and Homestake Pass
258 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 9 AM MONDAY TO NOON MDT TUESDAY ABOVE 5000 FEET…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions.
Total snow accumulations of 4 to 8 inches, with localized amounts up to 12 inches, are expected.

* WHERE…Central and Southern Lewis and Clark, Jefferson and Broadwater Counties.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Be prepared for significant reductions in visibility at times. Isolated tree and power line damage expected.
…………………………….
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Cheyenne WY
233 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…Significant Accumulating Snowfall Likely Over the Higher Elevations of Southeast Wyoming Tonight Through Monday Night…

Sierra Madre Range-Snowy Range-Including the cities of Centennial and Albany
233 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING EFFECT UNTIL MIDNIGHT MDT MONDAY NIGHT…

* TOTAL SNOW ACCUMULATIONS…12 to 16 inches, especially above 9000 feet in the Snowy and Sierra Madre mountain ranges.
Locally higher amounts are possible.

Those planning outdoor activities in the Snowy and Sierra Madre mountain ranges should be prepared for hazardous winter conditions.

…………………………..
URGENT – WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Cheyenne WY
233 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…Significant Accumulating Snowfall Likely Over the Higher Elevations of Southeast Wyoming Tonight Through Monday Night…

South Laramie Range-Including the cities of Buford, Pumpkin Vine, and Vedauwoo

233 PM MDT Sun Oct 1 2017

…WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM THIS EVENING TO MIDNIGHT MDT MONDAY NIGHT…

The National Weather Service in Cheyenne has issued a Winter Storm Warning for heavy snowfall, which is in effect from 6 PM this evening to midnight MDT Monday night.

TIMING…Periods of snow will be possible this evening, but the snow will be on the increase late tonight, and may become heavy at times Monday before tapering off Monday night.

* TOTAL SNOW ACCUMULATIONS…6 to 9 inches possible, with highest amounts over the Interstate 80 summit.

* WINDS/VISIBILITY…Visibility may be reduced below one half mile at times in falling snow.

* IMPACTS…Mainly to travel, especially over the Interstate 80 Summit between Laramie and Cheyenne. Roads could become slick and snow packed along with areas of low visibility.

http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=usa&wwa=Winter%20Storm%20Warning

Thanks to Tom0Mason for this link

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