question

What modulates our Sun? The majority of science work on the principle that the Sun is self modulating and each solar cycle is a product of a random number generator. There are others that suspect the Sun is modulated by the planets with a special emphasis on Uranus & Neptune. Thanks to Carl Smith who has recently left us we have new knowledge that significantly adds to Jose, Landscheidt & Charvàtovà's work.

Geoff Sharp

Feed aggregator

Is Arctic sea ice really disappearing?

IceAgeNow - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 17:08

Have you heard the latest one? Polar bears are supposedly starving because Arctic sea ice has declined by 50 percent in the last 30 years.

That sea-ice decline is also supposed to (somehow) cause record cold temperatures (somewhere).

Trouble is, this image from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) clearly shows quite the contrary.

Extent of Arctic Sea Ice – Jan 2018 – NSIDC

The white area shows Arctic sea-ice extent as of January, 2018.

The magenta line shows the 30-year median sea-ice extent for January.

Not exactly the catastrophic ice loss that we’ve been lead to believe, is it?

https://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index

I captured the above image from the NSIDC website today, 15 Feb 2018.

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Spring on hold in the UK

IceAgeNow - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 16:20

Britain was hit by freezing temperatures as the mercury plunged to bone-chilling lows over the last week, with lows of -6.4C recorded in Shoreham on Thursday.

13 Feb 2018 – On Wednesday, the mercury fell to -9.9C in Shap, Cumbria, overnight and to -7.6C in Sennybridge.

Yellow weather warnings were issued for snow and ice for Scotland, north-west England, Wales, and south-west England for Tuesday.

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.express.co.uk/news/weather/917808/UK-weather-when-does-weather-get-warmer-UK-when-does-Spring-start&ved=2ahUKEwjdx7vjlKLZAhVC12MKHcYICkIQFjABegQICBAB&usg=AOvVaw0iR5uwyEHJnuSurbgFidpV

Thanks to David Grissim for this link

“Seems spring is on hold,” says David

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Going into a Maunder Minimum Mini Ice Age – Video

IceAgeNow - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 16:06

Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is dropping.

 

Falling total solar irradiance means we are entering a cooling period on Earth.

Rather than ‘global warming,’ what we really need to think about is the impact on agriculture.

Video from Adapt 2030.

Also see:
New Science 22: Solar TSI leads Earth’s temperature with an 11 year delay
http://joannenova.com.au/2016/02/new-science-22-solar-tsi-leads-earths-temperature-with-an-11-year-delay/

Thanks to Jack Hydrazine for this video and the link

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Cold and frost in southern Brazil in the height of summer

IceAgeNow - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 15:21

The tenth frost of the 2017/2018 summer season.

15 Feb 2018 – The city of São Joaquim registered the third frost of February this morning, Thursday the 15th.

Temperature has dropped to as low as 3,9°C (39°F) in some localities throughout the mountainregion this morning.

The low temperature was registered in Vale do Caminhos da Neve, about 3km from the center of São Joaquim.

http://saojoaquimonline.com.br/2018/02/15/com-3-9c-sao-joaquim-assinala-mais-uma-geada-de-verao/

Thanks to Wagner for this link

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Japan – Underwater supervolcano stirring to life

IceAgeNow - Thu, 02/15/2018 - 05:04

A giant lava bubble is expanding at Kikai volcano, a supervolcano just 31 miles south of Japan’s main island of Kyushu.

More than 31 cubic kilometers (7.4 cubic miles) of lava have shoved the seabed up around 2,000 feet, creating a giant dome with a diameter of about six miles.

The rising dome, with its peak is now less than 100 feet (30 m) below the ocean’s surface, is estimated to contain a much more immense volume of lava than the Yellowstone or Long Valley calderas.

 

The area also contains active hydrothermal springs and dense streams of gas bubbling up from the sea bed.

“The most serious problem that we are worrying about is not an eruption of this lava dome, but the occurrence of the next supereruption,” said Yoshiyuki Tatsumi a volcanologist at Kobe University in Japan and lead author of the new study published in Nature Scientific Reports.

Dr. Tatsumi thinks the chances of a supereruption in the within the next 100 years are only about 1 percent. But when that eruption comes, it could eject nearly 10 cubic miles of magma (not ash, but magma!), enough to cover almost all of Japan in ash nearly eight inches thick, he found.

Researchers say such an eruption could kill some 100 million people who live within its fallout zone, which includes the cities of Nagasaki, Hiroshima and Osaka.

Such an eruption would also have a serious effect on global climate. Temperatures would plunge and crops would fail.

Kikai has exploded catastrophically before. Japanese volcanologists have found evidence of an eruption of 500 cubic kilometres (120 cubic miles!) of magma some 7,300 years ago (the Akahoya eruption), another about 95,000 years ago, and yet another about 140,000 years ago.

(Look at this graph on one of my previous posts: Temperatures plummeted about 7,300 years ago.)

“The post-caldera activity is regarded as the preparation stage to the next super-eruption,” Tatsumi told Live Science, “not as the calming-down stage from the previous super-eruption.”

See video:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/tunedin/a-supervolcano-near-japan-seems-to-be-building-up-for-an-eruption/vi-BBJ8EUW

http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/natural-wonders/kikai-supervolcano-rising-lava-dome-reveals-magma-pressure-is-rising-beneath-japan/news-story/d0398a120cc96ddb0bcbb74ed8796960

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-21066-w

 

______________
Although you may not have heard of it before, Kikai is already considered an active volcano. Minor eruptions occur frequently on Mount Iō on the island of Iōjima, which lies on the caldera rim.

The most recent eruptions occurred in 2001, 1982, 1980, 1978, 1976, 1974?, 1969?, 1967, 1957 and 1943.

Kikai Caldera was the source of the Akahoya eruption, one of the largest eruptions during the last twelve thousand years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kikai_Caldera

Thanks to Laurel and several others for these links

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Frigid temperatures kill 53 in Taiwan

IceAgeNow - Wed, 02/14/2018 - 15:48

“More possible deaths feared as mercury set to plunge further”

Before you read this, let me say that I find it very hard to believe that 10°C (50°F) weather would kill anyone. Be that as it may, the following was published on Taiwan News on January 31.

As temperatures plummeted to 10° to 12°C (50 to 53.6 F)  in all parts north of Tainan, 53 people lost their lives to the bitter cold yesterday. More lives are at risk as an intense cold surge is set to arrive on Saturday.

A major cold surge is set to strike Taiwan, causing the mercury in all points north of central Taiwan to drop down to 6 to 7 degrees (42.8 to 44.6F). During this period, Hehuanshan, Taipingshan, Lalashan, Qixingshan, and Datunshan are all likely to see snowfall.

Central to northern Taiwan will see the mercury plunge to 8 degrees, and open areas could see the temperature drop to as low as one to two degrees (33.8 to 35.6F).

Mountainous areas above 1,000 meters are likely to see snow, including Qixingshan and Datunshan from Saturday until Monday.

“The drop in temperatures can cause an increased likelihood of sudden death,” the article continues.

As I said, I find this very hard to believe.

However, the article proceeds to quote Taipei Medical University Director of Critical Care Medicine Kao Wei-feng, who said that 95 percent of sudden deaths brought on by cold weather are related to heart ailments. Cold temperatures increase the possibility of high blood pressure, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Kao advised those at risk individuals experiencing unusual chest tightness, chest pain or upper abdominal pain to seek immediate medical attention.

See entire article:
https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3352303

Thanks to Glenn Cuthbert for this link

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More snow for southern Morocco

IceAgeNow - Wed, 02/14/2018 - 11:00

It has not snowed in Ouarzazate in more than 40 years, but today (7 Feb 2018), “Ouarzazate is coated in brilliant white and its Sahara Desert is buried under  40 centimeters (15.7 inches) of snow.”

Zoubir Bouhout, Director of Local Tourism Office (CRT) in Ouarzazate, told Morocco World News that there will be “positive and negative impacts on the area.”

“There are some difficulties that snow is presenting for now, such as blocked roads to Marrakech, Tichka, Sekkoura, Tinghir, and others that lead in and out of the region,” said Bouhout.

However, Bouthout continued, “(it) will fill Ouarzazate’s El Mansour Eddahabi dam and provide potable water for inhabitants as well as supplementary water for farming.”

Quarzazate – Courtesy Wikipedia

Nicknamed The door of the desert, Ouarzazateis a city in south-central Morocco. Ouarzazate stands at an elevation of 1,160 metres (3,810 ft). To the south of the town is the desert.

Ouarzazate, Morocco Under Snow: Winter Wonderland

Earth.nullschool 3-hour precipitation accumulation 08Feb2018 0000Z
(the green ring is the location of Ouarzazate).

EOSDIS Worldview Morocco 08Feb18

Station Téléphérique Oukaïmeden, Morocco

Thanks to Philip Mulholland for these links

See also: First snowfall ever in parts of Morocco
https://www.iceagenow.info/first-snowfall-ever-parts-morocco/

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Heavy snowfall crippling northern Pakistan

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:41

13 Feb 2018 – More than 800 vehicles stranded. No food. No water.

Vehicles were stranded on the roads in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa on the second consecutive day, with passengers facing shortage of food and other necessities.

One of the tourists, who was staying at a hotel near Nathiagali, said there was no food or water at the facility.

“The hotel [management] is saying shops around their facility are closed which is why they cannot get us food,” she told Geo News. “They have lavatories but there is no water here.”

People have lost contact with their relatives as there is no electricity to charge their mobile phones and other devices.

https://www.geo.tv/latest/181706-heavy-snowfall-continues-to-cripple-life-in-northern-areas

Stranded vehicles in Shangla district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
https://www.geo.tv/assets/uploads/updates/2018-02-13/181706_9680486_updates.jpg

(With video)
LAHORE: Chief Minister (CM) of Punjab Shehbaz Sharif on Monday night issued orders to rescue stranded citizens in northern parts of the country after a heavy rain and snowfall paralysed movement in parts of Azad Kashmir, Nathia Gali in Abbottabad, and Galyat, stranding at least 800 vehicles and hundreds of citizens.

Stranded tourists, including women and children, had earlier appealed to the authorities to provide urgent rescue service.

At least 800 stranded vehicles formed long lines on roads blocked by piles of snow due to heavy snowfall that also blocked land routes to Islamabad from four districts of Azad Kashmir.

https://www.geo.tv/latest/181599-at-least-800-vehicles-stranded-in-muzaffarabad-due-to-heavy-snowfall

Thanks to Argiris Diamantis for these links

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Killer snowfall in Japan – Five times more than average

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:28

By 5 p.m. Monday, the city of Fukui saw 3 feet (92 cm) of snow, five times more than an average year. The cities of Toyama and Niigata marked 52 cm and 24 cm of snow, respectively.

13 Feb 2018 – At least five people died in prefectures facing the Sea of Japan and elsewhere as heavy snowfall hit the areas Monday, according to a Kyodo News tally.

Heavy snowfall is expected to continue in Sea of Japan coastal areas through Tuesday.

https://japantoday.com/category/national/5-die-as-snowfall-hits-sea-of-japan-coast

Impressive photo:
A woman walks during heavy snow in Fukui on Monday.
https://japantoday-asset.scdn3.secure.raxcdn.com/img/store/a0/e5/9e4105b14d82c5ae2d9ee7792b06deb02cbe/fukuisnow/_w850.jpg

Thanks to Argiris Diamantis for these links

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If Yellowstone erupts, “climate shift” would be the least of our worries

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 17:39

The loss of the ENTIRE “bread basket” of North America (think zero corn or wheat… for starters)

__________________

Yellowstone “climate shift” would be the least of our worries

By E. M. Smith

Wiping out most everyone north of Texas and East of California would probably rank higher…

Ash would be FEET thick as far as Nebraska and deep enough in Chicago to kill of most folks. Even NYC and DC would likely be ashed up enough to cause massive respiratory disease.

Then the loss of the ENTIRE “bread basket” of North America (think zero corn or wheat… for starters) would be a big issue for anyone who survived the first blasts.

Yeah, anyone who made it to year 2 might care about how hot or cold it was, but frankly, without a functioning USA government, food supply, military, transport system, or energy system; not many folks will get through the first winter anyway.

How many people today in North Texas could survive without heating / AC / medical care / grocery stores / gasoline / and municipal water? In a minus-whatever winter?

Pretty much the “safe zone” is most of California maybe up to Washington coastal areas, then down across the very south of the south west and along the gulf coast to Florida. Even there, if the wind shifts you get some ash. Folks in Florida can likely survive by fishing and eating ‘gators; as long as the S. Americans and Mexicans are nice to them.

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Yellowstone super eruption would cause a ‘climate shift’

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 16:52

We’d be talking instantaneous ice age.

Yellowstone is “under strain” according to a group of seismologists monitoring the volcano.
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Seismologists from UNAVCO, a nonprofit university-governed consortium, are using “Global Positioning System, borehole tiltmeters, and borehole strainmeters” to measure minute changes in deformation at Yellowstone.

These strainmeters are extremely sensitive, so sensitive that they can record surface waves on Yellowstone Lake.

In an article for the Billings Gazette, David Mencin and Glen Mattioli, geodesists with UNAVCO, say “the strain signal is larger than would be expected if the crust under Yellowstone were completely solid”.

However, they add “these findings are no cause for alarm.”

A Yellowstone supervolcanic eruption “could could be a staggering 6,000 times as powerful as the one from Washington’s Mount St Helens in 1980,” says express.co.uk.

If such an eruption should occur, “a climate shift would ensue as the volcano would spew massive amounts of sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere, which can form a sulphur aerosol that reflects and absorbs sunlight.”

http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/yellowstone-is-under-strain-and-it-can-be-measured/article_f1ad8977-d021-526e-86ce-903ae9dd789a.html

https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/918315/Yellowstone-ERUPTION-volcano-Supervolcano-STRAIN-magma-chamber-pressure

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Arctic Brrrrreaking Cold Records

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 16:40

I wonder how much Arctic ice is melting at minus 65 degrees.

_______________________________

When temperatures drop below -60 C, just about everyone will stay home and not risk going outside and expose skin. Schools in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, on the northwestern shore of Hudson Bay, have therefore remained closed for the past few days.

“I don’t remember the last time we actually closed due to weather. This is a bit of an extreme,” said Mike Osmond, chair of the Rankin Inlet District Education Authority. Temperatures are running almost 15 degrees colder than normal.

Temperatures are getting to –40 C (-40 F) before the windchill and when the winds are factored in, it feels colder than –60 C.

“You’ve got blustery winds with some of the coldest temperatures that people have ever experienced,” said David Phillips, senior climatologist with Environment Canada.

http://churchillpolarbears.org/2018/02/arctic-weather-brrrrreaking-records/

Thanks to TomOMason for this link

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Great Lakes ice cover reached 69.1% on Saturday

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 16:24

According to WOOD TV in Grand Rapids, Michigan, “(That’) only the 2nd time that we have had that much ice cover on the Great Lakes in the last 24 years (the other time was 2014).”

“The first 11 days of Feb. were 6.3 deg. colder than average in Grand Rapids, 7.3 deg. colder than avg. in Milwaukee and 8.0 deg. colder than average in Chicago.”

http://woodtv.com/blog/2018/02/12/great-lakes-now-69-1-ice-covered/

Thanks to Ron994 for this link

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Chicago ties record of 9 consecutive days of measurable snowfall

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 16:13

Ties similar nine-day runs from Jan. 29-Feb. 6, 1902 and Jan. 6-14, 2009. – Also see video.

Measurable snow logged daily from February 3-11.

As of noon Sunday, there was 13 inches (33 cm) of snow on the ground at O’Hare, 14 inches (35.6 cm) at Midway, and 15 inches (38 cm) in Arlington Heights.

http://wgntv.com/2018/02/11/its-official-chicago-ties-record-for-nine-consecutive-days-with-measurable-snowfall/
11FEB2018

Thanks to Jack Hydrazine for this link

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Dear Lord, what were you thinking?

IceAgeNow - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 12:53

“Many analysts concluded that the election reflected growing frustration with an ever-expanding federal government that had largely discarded the concept of federalism and was dictating too many aspects of our lives – denying families, states and companies the right to make decisions about their futures, so long as they don’t harm others.”  – Paul Driessen
____________________

Dear Lord, what were you thinking?

A subtle suggestion during a jazz concert got me thinking about history, politics and energy

By Paul Driessen

What a marvelous evening it was. World-class drummer Tommy Igoe and his Birdland All-Stars treated the George Mason University Center for the Arts audience to a joyous evening of jazz, funk, Brazilian and original music that featured new renditions of classics by David Bowie, The Police, Steely Dan, Charlie Parker and other famed artists. Every high-energy number captivated these jazz aficionados.

It was the band’s third stop on a month-long, 20-city “Art of Jazz” tour. Ten brilliant musicians on brass, guitar, percussion and keyboard, from US coasts and beyond, revved up the tempo for 90 solid minutes. As they played, eleventh artist Jeremy Sutton captured the action on canvas, paper and iPad. With bold, splashy strokes, he brought the players and instruments to life in colorful montages. It was mesmerizing.

Igoe introduced their third number, “Dear Lord, what were you thinking,” with a sly, subtle suggestion that it might have political meaning, perhaps tied to the last election, perhaps to something else entirely.

It got me thinking. What indeed was our Creator thinking, when he gathered those brilliant, classically educated farmers, merchants and tradesmen from all over Colonial America, perhaps giving them Divine Guidance to debate ideas and craft documents that declared independence from the then-most powerful nation on Earth, launched a novel, untested form of government – and birthed the bold notion that all men (and women) are created equal … at least as an ideal, at least eventually, at least after the long, bitter struggles of the Civil War and Abolition, Suffrage and Civil Rights Movements?

They didn’t stop there. The 1787 Constitution also launched the concept of federalism: the idea that a national government should legislate and rule only on national issues, but otherwise should leave individual states to innovate and test their own governing principles, for better or worse. They might devise brilliant solutions that are copied by all, or provide glaring examples of what not to do elsewhere.

Concerned about pure democracies and a tyranny of majorities, our Founding Fathers also established a separation of powers via three co-equal branches of government – and an Electoral College to prevent big urban areas from overwhelming sparsely populated rural and small town areas during presidential races. Five candidates have since received a majority of votes, but not electoral districts, and so lost their bids.

It was to be a limited government of, by and for the people, through representatives chosen by the people. In other words, as Benjamin Franklin put it, “a republic, if you can keep it.”

Fast forward the 21st century. Lord, what were you thinking this time around, as the Founders’ vision was sorely tested on so many fronts, and the US political scene tossed and turned? My take on recent history:

Innovative, entrepreneurial spirits – aided by federalism, private land and mineral ownership, and an ability to get well underway before antagonistic federal regulators knew about it – launched a “fracking” revolution that unlocked gushers of oil and natural gas, ended “peak oil” fears, created numerous jobs, sent US and global energy prices tumbling, and powered US oil and gas production to record highs.

The Electoral College functioned as intended, with 84% of US counties selecting a presidential candidate not favored by a majority of voters in mostly large metropolitan centers. Many analysts concluded that the election reflected growing frustration with an ever-expanding federal government that had largely discarded the concept of federalism and was dictating too many aspects of our lives – denying families, states and companies the right to make decisions about their futures, so long as they don’t harm others.

A belief that government agencies and workers had become too secretive and unaccountable fueled this anxiety. Another major source of discontent was the feeling that Washington was imposing an attitude that the nation’s best years were behind it – that our right and ability to grow and prosper were being shackled. Businesses and families felt this acutely in Middle America, a vast area that voted heavily for candidate Trump and which many of its inhabitants felt was too often dismissed as “Flyover Country.” Yet another concern involved the growing bureaucratic “fourth branch” of government, with a seeming disrespect for the rule of law and too close relationship with a news media seen as increasingly partisan.

Closely related was the anger and frustration many had with government agencies and activist groups that ignored the enormous environmental progress America has made over the past four decades, and were demanding that we spend trillions of dollars on imaginary problems and for barely detectable (or even fabricated) benefits from further reductions in pollution – even substances that clearly are not pollutants: plant-fertilizing, crop-enhancing, planet-greening, life-giving carbon dioxide, for instance.

Those attitudes and actions reflected an obsession in some quarters with “dangerous manmade climate change” and fostered a war on fossil fuels that was locking up the nation’s huge energy supplies, driving up energy costs, forcing businesses to downsize or close their doors, killing jobs, and driving young people back to their parents’ basements or out of small towns in search of employment and better lives.

These voters were buoyed, above all, by hope that a new Washington team would bring change, reform the regulatory state, reduce burdensome taxes and regulations, and once again unleash America’s too long pent-up entrepreneurial, innovative and investment instincts, passions, spirits, abilities and determination.

The evidence suggests their hope is being rewarded, say former CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Pudzer and other observers. In anticipation of and response to an exit from the Paris climate accord, a reemphasis on fossil fuels, and multiple regulatory and tax reductions, the Dow Jones skyrocketed from 17,888 points on November 3, 2017 to an unprecedented 26,617 on January 26, 2018 – before plummeting an unheard of 2,500 points over the next six trading days, then went on a rollercoaster of corrections and profit taking.

Portfolio values soared for millions of college and retirement funds, and company, union and government pension funds. Even San Francisco decided not to eliminate fossil fuels from its pension holdings.

Over 125 companies gave hefty bonuses to employees. Walmart and other companies raised salaries. ExxonMobil plans to repatriate $50 billion for reinvestment in America, while Apple intends to bring back $350 billion over the next five years, creating 20,000 new jobs in the process. Overall, during 2017, the US economy added over 2 million full-time jobs with benefits, says the Bureau of Labor Statistics, despite two major hurricanes in Q3, the first big ones to hit the US mainland in a record twelve years.

In 2016, says Pudzer, the BLS recorded “the highest number of people working part time at year’s end since it began recording the data in 1968. In 2017, it recorded the highest number of people working full time at year’s end since 1968 and the fewest working part-time since 2011.” Meanwhile, GDP growth averaged 3% during the last three quarters of 2017, compared to a meager 1.5% during 2016.

Back on the energy and climate front, the Energy Information Administration says fossil fuels will still provide 78% of US energy in 2050globally too. Wind and solar remain too expensive, unreliable and land-intensive to power economies or give impoverished nations the living standards they dream of.

Meanwhile, the Obama EPA’s MAGGICC climate analysis model determined that even shutting down all US coal-fired power plants and drastically limiting the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions – at a cost of up to $39 billion per year – would prevent just 0.03 degrees F of manmade global warming by 2100, even assuming CO2 drives climate change, because the world will still be burning fossil fuels. In fact, all the damage and dire threats supposedly caused by greenhouse gases exist only in computer climate models.

And those models haven’t worked in the past, don’t work now and are unlikely to work in the foreseeable future, say scientists like William Happer and Anthony Sadar. That’s because they focus on CO2, ignore the most important atmospheric gas (water vapor) and can’t solve enough equations needed to accurately describe Earth’s climate. Relying on them to decide energy and economic policies is folly and fakery.

So ponder this constitutional and political history, these energy and climate realities, the dreams of people the world over for better lives – and then enjoy a marvelous evening of Birdland All-Stars jazz and art.

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org) and author of books and articles on energy and environmental policy.

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Austria – Snowfall causes traffic chaos

IceAgeNow - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 18:59

12 Feb 2018 – Heavy snowfall led to massive traffic disruption in Carinthia this morning.

According to the ÖAMTC, the Tauernautobahn (A10) had to be closed in the direction of Salzburg near Feistritz and Villach.

Also the Seeberg road (B82) in the district Völkermarkt had to be closed. Chains were required for trucks Monday morning on the A2 at the grave tunnel. On higher roads, chains were required for all vehicles: on the Weissensee road, on the Turracher Höhe, on the Katschberg, on the Koralm road, on the Klippitztörl, on the Wurzenpass and on the Plöckenpass.

The Paulitschsattel had to be closed due to snowfall in both directions, and the Arlberg expressway (S16) had to be closed in the morning.

On Monday, it is snowing in the west, along the northern side of the Alps and often in the south, sometimes vigorously. The snowfall is between low elevations and 600 meters.

Early-morning temperatures ranged from minus three to plus two degrees, the daily highs from zero to five degrees.”

http://www.wetter.at/wetter/oesterreich-wetter/Schneefaelle-sorgen-fuer-Verkehrschaos/3215 02581

Thanks to Jimmy Walter for this link

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Our planet has enjoyed 10 warm periods during the past 10,000 years

IceAgeNow - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 05:33

There is absolutely nothing unusual about today’s so-called global warming (or “climate change”).

Look at how many periods of warmth our planet has enjoyed during the past 10,000 years alone.

Civilizations flourished during those warm periods, and collapsed when they ended.

Did humans cause the Minoan warm period of of about 3,300 years ago?
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Did humans cause the Roman warm period of about 2,100 years ago?

Did humans cause the Medieval warm period of about 1,000 years ago?

What about all of those other warm periods? Should we blame Fred Flintstone, perhaps?

Now look at where we are today (at the far right side of the graph).

If the downward trend in temperature of the past 3,300 years continues, we could be in a heap of trouble. While our leaders keep on wringing their collective hands over global warming, we could be blindsided by an ice age.

As far as I’m concerned, all this talk about human-caused global warming is sheer nonsense, if not downright fraud. The record shows that both periods of warmth – and periods of cold – hit our planet with almost consistent regularity.

______________________

The above chart is based on data from GISP2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2). GISP2 drilled cores into the Greenland ice more than  3000 meters (almost 2 miles) deep, allowing scientists to study climate variability for the past 125,000 years.

I found the above chart in this great video by Rod Martin, Jr.
Top 10 Climate Lies Exposed
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Record snowfall in Windsor, Ontario

IceAgeNow - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 14:14

A record 18.4 cm of snow fell on Windsor on Friday, according to Environment Canada.

Another two to four cm of snow is forecast through Sunday.

Windsor is located across the Detroit River from Detroit, Michigan.

http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/more-snowfall-expected-throughout-the-weekend

Thanks to Clay Olson for this link

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Snow-covered beaches of Barcelona

IceAgeNow - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 14:01

10 Feb 2018 – Snowfall on a good part of Spain. Thirteen regions were on alert yesterday. Barcelona activated its emergency plan.

Barcelona, located on the Mediterranean Sea, is not equipped for snowfall.

According to Wikipedia, the city boasts a humid subtropical climate bordering a maritime Mediterranean climate, with mild, humid winters and warm to hot summers.

A temperature of -21 degrees was recorded in the city of Girona between Barcelona and the French border.

http://fr.euronews.com/2018/02/09/les-plages-de-barcelone-enneigees

Thanks to Don Brown for this link

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Michigan city’s snowfall totals climbing toward record highs

IceAgeNow - Sat, 02/10/2018 - 19:48

With more snow on the way.

As of yesterday, Detroit’s season snow total is up to 50.4 inches, according to Jordan Dale, a meteorologist from the National Weather Service. Based on NWS records going back to 1874, this season now sits at 4th in terms of highest snow accumulation totals in the city’s history.

Snowfall totals are also running high for the city of Flint, Dale said.

“They’ve now had 60.2 inches and that comes in at 5th for their season total to date,” he said. “Their period of record starts in 1921.”

In the last 24-hours, an additional 4-8 inches of snow hit most communities across Michigan.

Southwest Michigan communities got hit the hardest: a whopping 15 inches in Dowagiac, 14.5 in Granger, and 14 in Coldwater.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/2018/02/10/michigan-now-forecast-detroit/325972002/

Thanks to Ryan for this link

“More than a foot of snow in Chicago suburbs, they got another round this morning, too,” says Ryan. “Also, it appears that New Hampshire and Vermont areas have gotten about a foot also from multiple storms recently.

“Cold weather all the way to New Mexico after Groundhog Day.”

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