question

What modulates our Sun? The majority of science work on the principle that the Sun is self modulating and each solar cycle is a product of a random number generator. There are others that suspect the Sun is modulated by the planets with a special emphasis on Uranus & Neptune. Thanks to Carl Smith who has recently left us we have new knowledge that significantly adds to Jose, Landscheidt & Charvàtovà's work.

Geoff Sharp

Feed aggregator

3½ ft of new snow in Colorado

IceAgeNow - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 19:07

19 May 2017 – Heavy snowfall shut down highways, caused thousands of power outages and forced schools and businesses to close.

The highest reported snow total so far was 42 inches near Allenspark, Colo., the National Weather Service said. Many other locations picked up between two and three feet.

It was Denver’s biggest mid-May snow in 42 years.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2017/05/19/three-feet-snow-wallops-rockies/101871406/

National Weather Service Twitter:
https://twitter.com/NWSBoulder/status/865404620494872579/photo/1

Thanks to Jack Hydrazine, H.B. Schmidt and Dean Koehler for these links


 

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Mount Stuart an Illegal Immigrant? – Video

IceAgeNow - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 02:47

Did Washington’s Mount Stuart travel 1,000 miles north from Mexico? Video by geologist Nick Zentner.

See a great map of what the super-continent Pangaea looked like.

“The Stuart Range near Leavenworth, Washington, is one of the most beautiful mountains in all of the American West,” says geologist Nick Zentner. “And yet its granite contains clues that continue to puzzle geologists.  Did the granite really form in Mexico and move a thousand miles north to central Washington?”

Most mountains in the Cascades were formed “only” 40 million years ago. However, the rocks on Mount Stuart were formed 93 million years ago.

But why? See Nick’s explanation.

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.


The post Mount Stuart an Illegal Immigrant? – Video appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Ash from Crater Lake volcanic eruption – Video

IceAgeNow - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 02:58

Oregon’s Mount Mazama erupted violently some 7,700 years ago, leaving an impressive crater (Crater Lake) where the mountain once rose high into the sky.

A blanket of volcanic ash from the eruption has become a well-known time marker for geologists throughout the Pacific Northwest.

This 3-minute video features a site right next to heavily-traveled Interstate 90 in central Washington in Johnson Canyon where the famous ash is exposed.

That’s 300 miles away from Crater Lake!

The Mount Mazama ash traveled much farther than that; far north into Canada, south into California, and east into Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, and Nevada.

The Mazama ash also traveled west, and is found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean.

Tom Foster (http://HUGEfloods.com) and Nick Zentner have been hiking together in eastern Washington for years. ‘Mazama Ash’ is part of an “I-90 Rocks” geology video series.

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.

This video was originally published on Dec 15, 2014.


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The Osceola MudFlow – With Nick on the Rocks

IceAgeNow - Wed, 05/17/2017 - 03:55

5,600 years ago, the summit of Mt Rainier stood 1,000 feet (304 m) higher than today. Then came a giant eruption and the side of the volcano failed, sending a wall of mud careening down the White River Valley all the way to Tacoma and Puget Sound, 40 miles away.

Originally published on Jan 19, 2017

Known as the Osceola MudFlow, up to 500 feet of “liquid cement,” as Nick puts it, shot down the valley at speeds up to 50 miles an hour to creat the Enumclaw Plain by burying the Puget Lowland with hundreds of feet of volcanic mud.

Today, the plain is home to more than 500,000 people.

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.


The post The Osceola MudFlow – With Nick on the Rocks appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Heaviest May Snowfall on Record in New Hampshire

IceAgeNow - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 23:49

Mt. Washington received a record breaking 33 inches of global warming over Mother’s Day weekend.

 

This weekend’s storm broke a couple weather records, including the largest snowfall for a single day in May, said Chris Kimble, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

“In 1967, 22.2 inches fell, and this weekend we got 22.9 and counting,” Kimble said.

So far, over 45 inches of snow have fallen at the observatory this month.

Other areas in New Hampshire also got snow, but not as much — from 3 to 9 inches, he said.

See: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/05/15/washington-gets-recordbreaking-snowfall-mass-prepares-for-heat/nUs9dljFvrrd7OyOMPdzbN/story.html

 

Thanks to Clay Olson and J Bird for this link

“Note how they attempt to minimize this news by talking about the warm temperatures coming in the forecast,” says J Bird

 

The post Heaviest May Snowfall on Record in New Hampshire appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Record Rainfall in Portland, Oregon

IceAgeNow - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 21:42

We’ve had 13″ of rain since March 1st!

Record rainfall for Portland. (At least in the last 80 years!)

http://www.kptv.com/link/492613/fox-12-weather-blog

Thanks to Aleta Mekvold for this info


 

The post Record Rainfall in Portland, Oregon appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Snow predicted for the Denver area

IceAgeNow - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 21:28
European model calls for 2 feet (60cm), but meteorologist Joe Bastardi thinks it will be measured in inches.

Then he adds, “it’s not global warming, it’s just the way the atmosphere does things.”

https://www.weatherbell.com/#services

Thanks to Ron de Haan for this link


The post Snow predicted for the Denver area appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Largest May snowstorm on record in New Hampshire

IceAgeNow - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 20:33
Mt. Washington received a record breaking 33.3 inches of global warming over Mother’s Day weekend.

This broke the previous record set in 1997 (from May 21 to 24) when the observatory was hit with 30.6 inches of snow.

Actually, this weekend’s storm broke a couple weather records, including the largest snowfall for a single day in May.

About 12 inches of snow typically falls in May at the observatory, which has an altitude of 6,300 feet.

“In 1967, 22.2 inches fell, and this weekend we got 22.9 and counting,” said Chris Kimble, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

So far, over 45 inches of snow have fallen at the observatory this month.

 

Other areas in New Hampshire also got snow, but not as much — from 3 to 9 inches, he said.

 

Check it out: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/05/15/washington-gets-recordbreaking-snowfall-mass-prepares-for-heat/nUs9dljFvrrd7OyOMPdzbN/story.html

Thanks to J Bird for this link

Note how they attempt to minimize this news by talking about the warm temperatures coming in the forecast.


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Geology of the Seattle area – Video

IceAgeNow - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 02:54

If you’ve ever lived in the Seattle area, you will find this video by geologist Nick Zentner absolutely fascinating.

The geology of the Seattle, Washington, area is a direct result of multiple glacial advances that left drumlins, outwash, glacial troughs, and scattered glacial erratics as evidence of their passage.

Old tidelands filled by early residents of Seattle are now home to the SODO district, an active commercial area where both the Seattle Seahawks and the Seattle Mariners stadiums are located.

This video, entitled “Geology of Seattle and the Puget Sound,” was originally published on March 2, 2015

Tom Foster (http://HUGEfloods.com) and Nick Zentner (Central Washington University) have been hiking together in Washington for years. ’Geology of Seattle’ is part of an “I-90 Rocks” video series.


 

The post Geology of the Seattle area – Video appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Columbia River Gorge – Video by Nick Zentner

IceAgeNow - Mon, 05/15/2017 - 02:40

Beautiful!

The Columbia River Gorge features an incredible variety of geology and human history as it slices through the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest.

Nick Zentner talks about the Columbia River Basalts, the Missoula Floods, the Bonneville Flood, the Bridge of the Gods, Celilo Falls, Multnomah Falls, Beacon Rock, Lewis and Clark, the Oregon Trail, the Columbia River Highway, and more!

Columbia River Basalts Location – Nick Zentner

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.

Note:
I’ll be posting more fascinating episodes of “Nick on the Rocks” in the days to come.


 

The post Columbia River Gorge – Video by Nick Zentner appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Glacial Lake Missoula Flood – Longer Video

IceAgeNow - Sun, 05/14/2017 - 02:51

Glacial Lake Missoula was bigger than all five Great Lakes put together. The huge lake, created by 45-mile wide tongue of ice known as the Purcell Lobe,  had a surface area of more than 3,000 square miles. When the ice dam collapsed, the ensuing flood raced across the landscape at several hundred miles an hour, draining the lake in just a matter of days.

As the flood rolled down the Columbia River it reached the Wallula Gap in southern Washington, which created a bottleneck. As the flood squeezed through the bottleneck, water levels rose to 800 feet and backed up, temporarily forming Lake Lewis in the Pasco Basin behind it. The flood eventually dropped ice-rafted boulders as far south as the Willamette Valley in Oregon.

Wallula Gap – Copyright Robert W Felix

When I originally read the accounts of the flood and the bottleneck created by the Wallula Gap, I pictured a very narrow passageway. However, when I actually visited the area, I discovered that the Wallula Gap is 1.2 miles (2 km) wide, not exactly the constricted channel that I had envisioned.

This video was originally published by Nick Zentner on Jun 14, 2015. It shows evidence for the lake including strandlines above the city of Missoula, Montana, along with giant current ripples at Camas Prairie and striking rhythmites along Interstate 90 at Nine Mile Road near Missoula.

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.

Note:
I’ll be posting more fascinating episodes of “Nick on the Rocks” in the days to come.


 

 

The post Glacial Lake Missoula Flood – Longer Video appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Your Condo on the Moon

IceAgeNow - Sat, 05/13/2017 - 16:20
Or perhaps a beach-side villa?

Your Condo on the Moon

By  Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser

Colonizing the Moon has been claimed to be the stepping stone for colonizing planet Mars (NASA: “En Route to Mars”). Some folks are all in favor, with headlines like “Make American First on the Moon again!

Even the renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking has been adamant in his doom scenario projections:  In one hundred year or so, mankind can no longer live on earth. That’s a big “upgrade” from “… one thousand years …” that Hawking made just a few months ago. No wonder then, the (renewed) race to the moon and planets (not limited to Mars) is just getting underway.

The idea of the Moon as a gateway to colonize Mars and other planets now leads to questions of suitable housing for those (presumably happy) future colonists on any of these heavenly bodies. In turn, that new requirement fosters research into materials that could be useful for the purpose, including concrete. Recent research activities under way explore the formation and structural strengths of concrete under reduced or near-absent gravity, like in parabolic flights with suitable airplanes.

Parabolic Flights

Parabolic flights start from mid altitudes of around 8 km height. The airplane then goes into a steep ascent that is followed by a steep descent. Between the inflection points of the ascent and descent a brief (10-20 second) period of a near weightless environment exists in the plane that allows undertaking some testing experiments. The French company Novespace has modified an Airbus airplane, model A310-304 VIP, to allow such flights; the plane has been dubbed A310 ZERO-G.

Zero-G

If the chemical reactions are rapid enough, microscopic crystal growth and bulk strength of the resulting material can be studied. The formation of concrete and specific concrete mineral components like ettringite is just one of many items of interest.

What is Concrete?

Regular cement, also widely known as Portland Cement (i.e., the dry material) that you can buy in 60 lb bags at many outlets, is the most common type of concrete-forming material. It is basically a mixture of calcium and aluminum oxide and silicate with small amounts of magnesium, iron, and sulfate minerals. This powdery mixture, upon reaction with water, forms a variety of hydrated minerals that crystallize into a densely-packed arrangement of such micro-crystals.  The resulting concrete is like a hard rock that withstands the ravages of time much better than most other building materials.

In fact, there are few large land-based structures that do not contain concrete in one form or another. Accordingly, the world’s annual production of cement is in the order of billions of tons and one major energy use. What some people seem to forget though is that the formation of concrete does not just involve a dry powder but also another vital ingredient, generally known as WATER. For quality concrete to form, the water to cement ratio needs to be approximately 0.3. Without any water for the powder to react with to form concrete, nothing happens.

So when some potential future colonists or material engineers dream of building concrete skyscrapers or the like, anywhere in the universe, that little requirement of water is often overlooked. Even if cement could easily be produced from heating some rocks there, dear colonists-in-waiting, there simply is no water to tap, neither on the Moon nor on Mars.

Water, Water everywhere

NO, not at all!

If you want to find copious amounts of water, then better stay close by. Due to the coincidence of the seasonal spring runoff and heavy rainfall in recent weeks, some folks along the shores of rivers and lakes in Quebec are currently wishing for less water. Their basements are flooded and the Province has called for help by the army to provide relief from the rising “tide.”

The “Blue Planet,” planet Earth, is especially endowed with copious quantities of water – in contrast to the Moon or planet Mars. Perhaps, those bodies may have had plenty of water too, eons ago, but they do not now. For example, the so-called “polar ice caps” on Mars consist of “dry ice,” which is a term used for solid carbon dioxide – not frozen water.  Unfortunately for all would-be-colonists, the Moon has neither an atmosphere nor any known deposits of water either – and water is vital.

Water is Vital

Have you ever wondered how the astronauts on the Intl. Space Station (ISS) are keeping hydrated? Then perhaps, you know that they are living by drinking their own (purified) bodily fluids. That’s a fact; not to mention the high-energy radiation exposure from space. No wonder, even the ISS is under threat.

To wit: NASA is drawing up plans to scrap the Intl. Space Station in a few years and the New Scientist magazine reports that NASA may run out of usable space suits even before then.

So, dear hopeful astronauts, eager Moonlings and Marslings, sorry to have to crimp your expectations, no comfy high-rise condos on either the Moon or Mars anytime soon, not even concrete bunkers – regardless of Hawking’s proclamations with which not everyone agrees. For example, as A. Ozimek writes in Forbes magazine, “Sorry Nerds, but colonizing other planets is not a good plan.”

But never mind, just keep on dreaming!

_____________________________________________

Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser is a professional scientist with a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Technical University, Munich, Germany. He has worked as a research scientist and project chief at Environment Canada‘s Canada Centre for Inland Waters for over 30 years and is currently Director of Research at TerraBase Inc. He is author of nearly 300 publications in scientific journals, government and agency reports, books, computer programs, trade magazines, and newspaper articles.

Dr. Kaiser has been president of the International Association for Great Lakes Research, a peer reviewer of numerous scientific papers for several journals, Editor-in-Chief of the Water Quality Research Journal of Canada for nearly a decade, and an adjunct professor. He has contributed to a variety of scientific projects and reports and has made many presentations at national and international conferences.

Dr. Kaiser is author of CONVENIENT MYTHS, the green revolution – perceptions, politics, and facts
convenientmyths.com

Dr. Kaiser can be reached at: mail@convenientmyths.com

 

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Snow in northeastern British Columbia

IceAgeNow - Sat, 05/13/2017 - 16:04

Up to a foot (30 cm) of snow.

Friday 12 May 2017
Snowfall warning for Fort Nelson region

Snowfall, with total amounts of 20 to 30 cm (7.9″ to 11.8″) continues.

Up to 20 cm (7.9″) of snow has fallen along Hwy 97 near Sikanni Chief and Buckinghorse River today. A further 10 (3.9″) cm is expected tonight before it changes over to rain.

http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/report_e.html?bc7#182918538143582800201705120502ww1979cwvr

http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Thanks to Terry Homeniuk for these links

The post Snow in northeastern British Columbia appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Sunspot Counts Plummeting

IceAgeNow - Sat, 05/13/2017 - 11:57

And cosmic rays are intensifying

_______________________________

12 May 2017 – SUNSPOT COUNTS ARE PLUMMETING:

Today marks the 33rd day in 2017 that the sun has been blank–no sunspots. This exceeds the total number of spotless days in all of 2016 (32). The accelerating pace of spotlessness is a sign that Solar Minimum is approaching. Forecasters expect the sunspot cycle, which swings like a pendulum between high and low sunspot number every ~11 years, to reach its nadir in 2019-2020. Stay tuned for more blank suns.

Meanwhile, cosmic rays are intensifying.

See entire article:
http://spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=12&month=05&year=2017

Thanks to Jack Hydrazine for this link

 

The post Sunspot Counts Plummeting appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Air Crete Dome Homes – Video

IceAgeNow - Sat, 05/13/2017 - 02:36

Nothing to do with the coming ice age, but I find this concept fascinating.

Commenting on youtube, Mark Soares thinks Foam Cement is “the BEST building material in the world.”

“It is an ultra light masonry product weighing only 1/5 of the weight of ordinary concrete,” says Soares. “It is composed of 1 part water, 1 part cement (which is powdered or ground limestone), 1 part non toxic dish soap. The detergent is foamed using air from a compressor and a pump or motor to agitate the mixture (I use a conventional drill and paint mixer to blend it all together and it works fine). The expansion of trapped materials results in ”air” or oxygen molecules which comprise the majority of the material (I believe close to 80%) upon expansion.”

Soares adds that “it’s fire proof, water proof, insulating, bulletproof, earthquake proof, hurricane and monsoon proof, impervious to insects, rodents provides acoustic insulation and is 100% free of toxic of harmful substances, which makes it 100% biodegradable and completely recyclable. It is all natural and produces no by products. Also, as if it weren’t’ enough, it won’t rot, rust, corrode, warp under cold or heat or otherwise decompose in at least 30 years for my home so far.”

Thanks to Laurel for this video


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In Norway it should be sunny, instead it is snowing

IceAgeNow - Fri, 05/12/2017 - 08:48

“At least I do not have to worry about the neighbors noisy barbeque parties.”

________________________

Hello Robert.

I am writing to you
from Norway. we are in the spring
month of may. By this of the year it
is usually warm and summer like
conditions.

And it has been snowing outside this
night.

I have a strange feeling that the
spring may be delayed or we see the sign
of a new ice age.

I am also beginning to wonder about
this so called global warming….

Something does not feel right. At least i
do not have to worry about the neighbors
noisy barbeque parties.

Carl Frederik (Norway)

 

The post In Norway it should be sunny, instead it is snowing appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Glacial Lake Missoula Flood – Dry Falls – Video

IceAgeNow - Fri, 05/12/2017 - 02:57

A fascinating “Nick on the Rocks” video about Dry Falls in Washington state.

Nick describes it as “An ice-age flood, with water rocks, mud and icebergs 3½ miles wide on a thundering journey to the Pacific Ocean.”

The flood raced down the Columbia River with 10 times the power of all the world’s rivers combined.

Note:
I discuss this flood in detail in “Not by Fire but by Ice,” (Chapter 15, “Noah’s Deluge”).

I’ve made it a point to visit many of the viewing locations including Dry Falls, the Wallula Gap, and the Clark Fork River. That’s where a tongue of ice, the Purcell Lobe, moved south from Canada and dammed up the river to create Glacial Lake Missoula.

Glacial Lake Missoula was bigger than all five Great Lakes put together. When the ice dam broke, the ensuing flood, also known as the great scablands flood, created Dry Falls. 

When you view the video, even when you visit the area in person, it is almost impossible to understand the vast scale of what you’re seeing. This photo showing the visitor center in relation to the size of the falls helps a little.

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.

Note:
I’ll be posting more fascinating episodes of “Nick on the Rocks” in the days to come.


The post Glacial Lake Missoula Flood – Dry Falls – Video appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Giant Lava Flows – Video

IceAgeNow - Thu, 05/11/2017 - 02:45

In this fascinating episode of “Nick on the Rocks,” geology professor Nick Zentner takes us to “ground zero” where the Columbia River basalts originated.

More than volcanic 300 eruptions between 15 and 17 million years ago flooded much of the inland Pacific northwest.

These lava flows – some of the largest lava flows in the world – are known as the Columbia River basalts because the Columbia River has cut deeply enough to expose some of the flows.

In some cases these orange rivers of molten rock traveled more than 300 miles, totally burying more than a third of what is now Washington state.

The lavas erupted from giant cracks that can still be found today, and Nick takes you there.

Nick discusses the rich volcanic soil of eastern Washington – more than 100 feet deep in places – and shows us “spatter,” a kind of basalt that he describes as looking “almost like butter.” (I fail to see the likeness, but maybe I’d change my mind if I saw the “butter” in person.)

Nick Zentner is the science outreach and education coordinator for the Department of Geological Sciences at Central Washington University. He has produced more than 40 short videos about Central Washington geology.

Note:
I’ll be posting more fascinating episodes of “Nick on the Rocks” in the days to come.


The post Giant Lava Flows – Video appeared first on Ice Age Now.

Northeast at risk for freeze – Maybe snow

IceAgeNow - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 18:36

Conditions more typical of early April or March for an extended period. (I assume this is caused, of course, by global warming.)

A vortex could bring unseasonably chilly conditions and frost to the northeastern US into next week, according to AccuWeather.com.

Areas at risk for a frost or freeze will extend from part of the Great Lakes region to the central Appalachians and western New England early Wednesday morning.

There us even  a chance of wet snow in the mountains of eastern New York state and western New England.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/vortex-to-bring-episodes-of-chilly-air-frost-to-northeastern-us-into-next-week/ar-BBAWrhy?li=BBnb7Kz


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Highly unusual snowfall in Finland

IceAgeNow - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 16:45

Email from reader in Finland

Hello Robert,

It’s been snowing in Finland in May and it’s been highly unusual. I couldn’t find any English news about it yet, which seems a bit fishy to me. However, I’m sure they might report about it later on the Yle News section.

I try to keep on spreading the message about the coming mini ice age, but the mainstream media is doing a good job when it comes to pushing propaganda and lies about the “global warming”. We have a spotless sun again!

Also see: “April was colder, wetter and snowier than usual”
http://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/april_was_colder_wetter_and_snowier_than_usual/9590926

Thanks to Riku (Richard) in Finland for this info

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